Thursday, July 20, 2017

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 319.



YOUCAT Question n. 319 - Are we responsible for the sins of other people?


(Youcat answer)  No, we are not responsible for other peoples sins, unless we are guilty of misleading or seducing another person to sin or of cooperating in it or of encouraging someone else to sin or of neglecting to offer a timely warning or our help.

A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1868) Sin is a personal act. Moreover, we have a responsibility for the sins committed by others when we cooperate in them: - by participating directly and voluntarily in them; - by ordering, advising, praising, or approving them; - by not disclosing or not hindering them when we have an obligation to do so; - by protecting evil-doers.      

Reflecting and meditating 

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1736) Every act directly willed is imputable to its author: Thus the Lord asked Eve after the sin in the garden: "What is this that you have done?" (Gen 3:13). He asked Cain the same question (Cf. Gen 4:10). The prophet Nathan questioned David in the same way after he committed adultery with the wife of Uriah and had him murdered (Cf. 2 Sam 12:7-15). An action can be indirectly voluntary when it results from negligence regarding something one should have known or done: for example, an accident arising from ignorance of traffic laws.

(The next question is: Is there such a thing as structures of sin?)

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 318.



YOUCAT Question n. 318 - What are vices?


(Youcat answer) Vices are negative habits that deaden and dull the conscience, incline a person to evil, and habitually prepare him for sin.    

A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1865) Sin creates a proclivity to sin; it engenders vice by repetition of the same acts. This results in perverse inclinations which cloud conscience and corrupt the concrete judgment of good and evil. Thus sin tends to reproduce itself and reinforce itself, but it cannot destroy the moral sense at its root. 1865 

    Reflecting and meditating 

(Youcat comment) Human vices are found in connection with the capital sins of pride, avarice, envy, anger, lust, gluttony, and sloth (or acedia, spiritual boredom). 

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1867) The catechetical tradition also recalls that there are "sins that cry to heaven": the blood of Abel  (Cf. Gen 4:10), the sin of the Sodomites (Cf. Gen 18:20; 19:13), the cry of the people oppressed in Egypt (Cf. Ex 3:7-10), the cry of the foreigner, the widow, and the orphan (Cf. Ex 20:20-22), injustice to the wage earner (Cf. Deut 24:14-15; Jas 5:4).

(The next question is: Are we responsible for the sins of other people?)

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 317.



YOUCAT Question n. 317 - How can a person be delivered from a serious sin and reunited with God?


(Youcat answer)  In order to heal the break with God that is caused by a serious sin, a Catholic Christian must be reconciled with God through confession.

A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1856) Mortal sin, by attacking the vital principle within us - that is, charity - necessitates a new initiative of God's mercy and a conversion of heart which is normally accomplished within the setting of the sacrament of reconciliation: When the will sets itself upon something that is of its nature incompatible with the charity that orients man toward his ultimate end, then the sin is mortal by its very object…  whether it contradicts the love of God, such as blasphemy or perjury, or the love of neighbor, such as homicide or adultery.... But when the sinner's will is set upon something that of its nature involves a disorder, but is not opposed to the love of God and neighbor, such as thoughtless chatter or immoderate laughter and the like, such sins are venial (St. Thomas Aquinas, STh I-II, 88, 2, corp. art.).     

Reflecting and meditating 

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1446) Christ instituted the sacrament of Penance for all sinful members of his Church: above all for those who, since Baptism, have fallen into grave sin, and have thus lost their baptismal grace and wounded ecclesial communion. It is to them that the sacrament of Penance offers a new possibility to convert and to recover the grace of justification. The Fathers of the Church present this sacrament as "the second plank [of salvation] after the shipwreck which is the loss of grace" (Tertullian, De Paenit. 4, 2: PL 1, 1343; cf. Council of Trent (1547): DS 1542).

(The next question is: What are vices?)

Monday, July 17, 2017

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 316 - Part IV.



YOUCAT Question n. 316 - Part IV. How can we distinguish serious sins (mortal sins) from less serious (venial) sins?


(Youcat answer - repeated)  Serious sin destroys the divine power of love in a person’s heart, without which there can be no eternal beatitude. Hence it is also called mortal sin. Serious sin breaks with God, whereas venial sin only strains the relationship with him.

A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1860) Unintentional ignorance can diminish or even remove the imputability of a grave offense. But no one is deemed to be ignorant of the principles of the moral law, which are written in the conscience of every man. The promptings of feelings and passions can also diminish the voluntary and free character of the offense, as can external pressures or pathological disorders. Sin committed through malice, by deliberate choice of evil, is the gravest.

Reflecting and meditating 

(Youcat comment) A serious sin cuts a person off from God. One requirement for such a sin is that it be opposed to an important value, for instance, directed against life or God (for example, murder, blasphemy, adultery, and so on) and that it be committed with full knowledge and full consent. Venial sins are opposed to secondary values (honor, truth, property, and so on) or are committed without full knowledge of their seriousness or without full consent of the will. Such sins disrupt the relationship with God but do not sever it.

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1861) Mortal sin is a radical possibility of human freedom, as is love itself. It results in the loss of charity and the privation of sanctifying grace, that is, of the state of grace. If it is not redeemed by repentance and God's forgiveness, it causes exclusion from Christ's kingdom and the eternal death of hell, for our freedom has the power to make choices for ever, with no turning back. However, although we can judge that an act is in itself a grave offense, we must entrust judgment of persons to the justice and mercy of God. (CCC 1874) To choose deliberately - that is, both knowing it and willing it - something gravely contrary to the divine law and to the ultimate end of man is to commit a mortal sin. This destroys in us the charity without which eternal beatitude is impossible. Unrepented, it brings eternal death.

(The next question is: How can a person be delivered from a serious sin and reunited with God?)

Sunday, July 16, 2017

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 316 - Part III.



YOUCAT Question n. 316 - Part III. How can we distinguish serious sins (mortal sins) from less serious (venial) sins?


(Youcat answer - repeated)  Serious sin destroys the divine power of love in a person’s heart, without which there can be no eternal beatitude. Hence it is also called mortal sin. Serious sin breaks with God, whereas venial sin only strains the relationship with him.

A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1857) For a sin to be mortal, three conditions must together be met: "Mortal sin is sin whose object is grave matter and which is also committed with full knowledge and deliberate consent" (RP 17 § 12). (CCC 1858) Grave matter is specified by the Ten Commandments, corresponding to the answer of Jesus to the rich young man: "Do not kill, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honor your father and your mother"  (Mk 10:19). The gravity of sins is more or less great: murder is graver than theft. One must also take into account who is wronged: violence against parents is in itself graver than violence against a stranger.     

Reflecting and meditating 

(Youcat comment) A serious sin cuts a person off from God. One requirement for such a sin is that it be opposed to an important value, for instance, directed against life or God (for example, murder, blasphemy, adultery, and so on) and that it be committed with full knowledge and full consent. Venial sins are opposed to secondary values (honor, truth, property, and so on) or are committed without full knowledge of their seriousness or without full consent of the will. Such sins disrupt the relationship with God but do not sever it.

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1859) Mortal sin requires full knowledge and complete consent. It presupposes knowledge of the sinful character of the act, of its opposition to God's law. It also implies a consent sufficiently deliberate to be a personal choice. Feigned ignorance and hardness of heart (Cf. Mk 3:5-6; Lk 16:19-31) do not diminish, but rather increase, the voluntary character of a sin.     

(This question: How can we distinguish serious sins (mortal sins) from less serious (venial) sins? is continued)