Friday, December 2, 2016

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 207



YOUCAT Question n. 207 - Who may confirm?


(Youcat answer) The sacrament of Confirmation is normally administered by the Bishop. For weighty reasons when necessary, the bishop can also delegate a priest to do it. In danger of death, any priest can administer Confirmation.

A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1312) The original minister of Confirmation is the bishop (Cf. LG 26). In the East, ordinarily the priest who baptizes also immediately confers Confirmation in one and the same celebration. But he does so with sacred chrism consecrated by the patriarch or the bishop, thus expressing the apostolic unity of the Church whose bonds are strengthened by the sacrament of Confirmation. In the Latin Church, the same discipline applies to the Baptism of adults or to the reception into full communion with the Church of a person baptized in another Christian community that does not have valid Confirmation (Cf. CIC, Can. 883 § 2).

Reflecting and meditating 

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1313) In the Latin Rite, the ordinary minister of Confirmation is the bishop (Cf. CIC, Can. 882). If the need arises, the bishop may grant the faculty of administering Confirmation (Cf. CIC, Can. 884 § 2) to priests, although it is fitting that he confer it himself, mindful that the celebration of Confirmation has been temporally separated from Baptism for this reason. Bishops are the successors of the apostles. They have received the fullness of the sacrament of Holy Orders. The administration of this sacrament by them demonstrates clearly that its effect is to unite those who receive it more closely to the Church, to her apostolic origins, and to her mission of bearing witness to Christ. (CCC 1314) If a Christian is in danger of death, any priest should give him Confirmation (Cf. CIC, Can. 883 § 3). Indeed the Church desires that none of her children, even the youngest, should depart this world without having been perfected by the Holy Spirit with the gift of Christ's fullness.  

(The next question is: What is Holy Eucharist?)

Thursday, December 1, 2016

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 206 – Part III.



YOUCAT Question n. 206 - Part III. Who can be confirmed, and what is required of a candidate for Confirmation?


(Youcat answer - repeated) Any Catholic Christian who has received the sacrament of Baptism and is in the “state of grace” can be admitted to Confirmation.

A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1311) Candidates for Confirmation, as for Baptism, fittingly seek the spiritual help of a sponsor. To emphasize the unity of the two sacraments, it is appropriate that this be one of the baptismal godparents (Cf. OC Introduction 5; 6; CIC, Can. 893 §§ 1- 2). (CCC 1319) A candidate for Confirmation who has attained the age of reason must profess the faith, be in the state of grace, have the intention of receiving the sacrament, and be prepared to assume the role of disciple and witness to Christ, both within the ecclesial community and in temporal affairs.

Reflecting and meditating 

(Youcat comment) To be “in the state of grace” means not to have committed any serious sin (mortal sin). By a serious sin a person separates himself from God and can be reconciled with God only by making a good confession. A (young) Christian who is preparing for Confirmation finds himself in one of the most important phases of his life. He will do everything possible to grasp the faith with his heart and his understanding; he will pray alone and with others for the Holy Spirit; he will reconcile himself in every way with himself, with the people around him, and with God. Confession is part of this, since it brings one closer to God even if one has not committed a mortal sin.

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1310) To receive Confirmation one must be in a state of grace. One should receive the sacrament of Penance in order to be cleansed for the gift of the Holy Spirit. More intense prayer should prepare one to receive the strength and graces of the Holy Spirit with docility and readiness to act  (Cf. Acts 1:14).  1310  

(The next question isWho may confirm?)

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 206 – Part II.



YOUCAT Question n. 206 - Part II. Who can be confirmed, and what is required of a candidate for Confirmation?


(Youcat answer - repeated) Any Catholic Christian who has received the sacrament of Baptism and is in the “state of grace” can be admitted to Confirmation.

A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1307) For centuries, Latin custom has indicated "the age of discretion" as the reference point for receiving Confirmation. But in danger of death children should be confirmed even if they have not yet attained the age of discretion (Cf. CIC, cann. 891; 883, 3a).

Reflecting and meditating 

(Youcat comment) To be “in the state of grace” means not to have committed any serious sin (mortal sin). By a serious sin a person separates himself from God and can be reconciled with God only by making a good confession. A (young) Christian who is preparing for Confirmation finds himself in one of the most important phases of his life. He will do everything possible to grasp the faith with his heart and his understanding; he will pray alone and with others for the Holy Spirit; he will reconcile himself in every way with himself, with the people around him, and with God. Confession is part of this, since it brings one closer to God even if one has not committed a mortal sin.   

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1308) Although Confirmation is sometimes called the "sacrament of Christian maturity," we must not confuse adult faith with the adult age of natural growth, nor forget that the baptismal grace is a grace of free, unmerited election and does not need "ratification" to become effective. St. Thomas reminds us of this: Age of body does not determine age of soul. Even in childhood man can attain spiritual maturity: as the book of Wisdom says: “For old age is not honored for length of time, or measured by number of years.” Many children, through the strength of the Holy Spirit they have received, have bravely fought for Christ even to the shedding of their blood (St. Thomas Aquinas, STh III, 72, 8, ad 2; cf. Wis 4:8).

(This question: Who can be confirmed, and what is required of a candidate for Confirmation? is continued)

Monday, November 28, 2016

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 206 – Part I.



YOUCAT Question n. 206 - Part I. Who can be confirmed, and what is required of a candidate for Confirmation?


(Youcat answer) Any Catholic Christian who has received the sacrament of Baptism and is in the “state of grace” can be admitted to Confirmation.

A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1306) Every baptized person not yet confirmed can and should receive the sacrament of Confirmation (Cf. CIC, can. 889 § 1). Since Baptism, Confirmation, and Eucharist form a unity, it follows that "the faithful are obliged to receive this sacrament at the appropriate time" (CIC, can. 890), for without Confirmation and Eucharist, Baptism is certainly valid and efficacious, but Christian initiation remains incomplete.

Reflecting and meditating 

(Youcat comment) To be “in the state of grace” means not to have committed any serious sin (mortal sin). By a serious sin a person separates himself from God and can be reconciled with God only by making a good confession. A (young) Christian who is preparing for Confirmation finds himself in one of the most important phases of his life. He will do everything possible to grasp the faith with his heart and his understanding; he will pray alone and with others for the Holy Spirit; he will reconcile himself in every way with himself, with the people around him, and with God. Confession is part of this, since it brings one closer to God even if one has not committed a mortal sin.

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1309) Preparation for Confirmation should aim at leading the Christian toward a more intimate union with Christ and a more lively familiarity with the Holy Spirit - his actions, his gifts, and his biddings - in order to be more capable of assuming the apostolic responsibilities of Christian life. To this end catechesis for Confirmation should strive to awaken a sense of belonging to the Church of Jesus Christ, the universal Church as well as the parish community. The latter bears special responsibility for the preparation of confirmands (Cf. OC Introduction 3).  

(This question: Who can be confirmed, and what is required of a candidate for Confirmation? is continued)

Sunday, November 27, 2016

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 205 – Part II.



YOUCAT Question n. 205 - Part II. What happens in Confirmation?


(Youcat answer - repeated) In Confirmation the soul of a baptized Christian is imprinted with a permanent seal that can be received only once and marks this individual forever as a Christian. The gift of the Holy Spirit is the strength from above in which this individual puts the grace of his Baptism into practice through his life and acts as a “witness” for Christ.

A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1304) Like Baptism which it completes, Confirmation is given only once, for it too imprints on the soul an indelible spiritual mark, the "character," which is the sign that Jesus Christ has marked a Christian with the seal of his Spirit by clothing him with power from on high so that he may be his witness (Cf. Council of Trent (1547): DS 1609; Lk 24:48-49). 

Reflecting and meditating 

(Youcat comment) To be confirmed means to make a “covenant” with God. The confirmand says, “Yes, I believe in you, my God; give me your Holy Spirit, so that I might belong entirely to you and never be separated from you and may witness to you throughout my whole life, body and soul, in my words and deeds, on good days and bad.” And God says, “Yes, I believe in you, too, my child—and I will give you my Spirit, my very self. I will belong entirely to you. I will never separate myself from you, in this life or eternally in the next. I will be in your body and your soul, in your words and deeds. Even if you forget me, I will still be there—on good days and bad.”

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1305) This "character" perfects the common priesthood of the faithful, received in Baptism, and "the confirmed person receives the power to profess faith in Christ publicly and as it were officially (quasi ex officio)" (St. Thomas Aquinas, STh III, 72, 5, ad 2). (CCC 1317) Confirmation, like Baptism, imprints a spiritual mark or indelible character on the Christian's soul; for this reason one can receive this sacrament only once in one's life.     

(The next question is:  Who can be confirmed, and what is required of a candidate for Confirmation?)