Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 323 – Part II.



YOUCAT Question n. 323 – Part II. How can the individual be integrated into society in such a way that he nevertheless can develop freely?


(Youcat answer - repeated)  The individual can develop freely in society if the “principle of subsidiarity” is observed.    

 A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1884) God has not willed to reserve to himself all exercise of power. He entrusts to every creature the functions it is capable of performing, according to the capacities of its own nature. This mode of governance ought to be followed in social life. The way God acts in governing the world, which bears witness to such great regard for human freedom, should inspire the wisdom of those who govern human communities. They should behave as ministers of divine providence.

Reflecting and meditating 

(Youcat comment) The principle of subsidiarity, which was developed as part of Catholic Social Teaching, states: What individuals can accomplish by their own initiative and efforts should not be taken from them by a higher authority. A greater and higher social institution must not take over the duties of a subordinate organization and deprive it of its competence. Its purpose, rather, is to intervene in a subsidiary fashion (thus offering help) when individuals or smaller institutions find that a task is beyond them.

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1885) The principle of subsidiarity is opposed to all forms of collectivism. It sets limits for state intervention. It aims at harmonizing the relationships between individuals and societies. It tends toward the establishment of true international order.

(The next question is: On what principles does a society build?)

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 323 – Part I.



YOUCAT Question n. 323 – Part I. How can the individual be integrated into society in such a way that he nevertheless can develop freely?


(Youcat answer) The individual can develop freely in society if the “principle of subsidiarity” is observed.        

A deepening through CCC

V(CCC 1883) Socialization also presents dangers. Excessive intervention by the state can threaten personal freedom and initiative. The teaching of the Church has elaborated the principle of subsidiarity, according to which "a community of a higher order should not interfere in the internal life of a community of a lower order, depriving the latter of its functions, but rather should support it in case of need and help to co-ordinate its activity with the activities of the rest of society, always with a view to the common good" (CA 48 § 4; cf. Pius XI, Quadragesimo anno I, 184-186).  

Reflecting and meditating 

(Youcat comment) The principle of subsidiarity, which was developed as part of Catholic Social Teaching, states: What individuals can accomplish by their own initiative and efforts should not be taken from them by a higher authority. A greater and higher social institution must not take over the duties of a subordinate organization and deprive it of its competence. Its purpose, rather, is to intervene in a subsidiary fashion (thus offering help) when individuals or smaller institutions find that a task is beyond them.

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1894) In accordance with the principle of subsidiarity, neither the state nor any larger society should substitute itself for the initiative and responsibility of individuals and intermediary bodies.   

(This question: How can the individual be integrated into society in such a way that he nevertheless can develop freely? is continued)

Monday, July 24, 2017

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 322.



YOUCAT Question n. 322 - What is more important, society or the individual?


(Youcat answer)  In God’s sight every individual matters in the first place as a person and only then as a social being.

A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1892) "The human person… is and ought to be the principle, the subject, and the object of every social organization" (GS 25 § 1).

Reflecting and meditating 

(Youcat comment) Society can never be more important than the individual person. Men may never be means to a societal end. Nevertheless, social institutions such as the State and the family are necessary for the individual; they even correspond to his nature.

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1881) Each community is defined by its purpose and consequently obeys specific rules; but "the human person… is and ought to be the principle, the subject and the end of all social institutions" (GS 25 § 1).

(The next question is:  How can the individual be integrated into society in such a way that he nevertheless can develop freely?)

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 321- Part II.



YOUCAT Question n. 321 – Part II. Can a Christian be a radical individualist?


(Youcat answer - repeated)  No, a Christian can never be a radical individualist, because man is by nature designed for fellowship.

A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1880) A society is a group of persons bound together organically by a principle of unity that goes beyond each one of them. As an assembly that is at once visible and spiritual, a society endures through time: it gathers up the past and prepares for the future. By means of society, each man is established as an "heir" and receives certain "talents" that enrich his identity and whose fruits he must develop (Cf. Lk 19:13, 15). He rightly owes loyalty to the communities of which he is part and respect to those in authority who have charge of the common good.   

Reflecting and meditating 

(Youcat comment) Every person has a mother and a father; he receives help from others and is obliged to help others and to develop his talents for the benefit of all. Since man is God’s “image”, in a certain way he reflects God, who in his depths is not alone but triune (and thus life, love, dialogue, and exchange). Finally, love is the central commandment for all Christians; through it we profoundly belong together and are fundamentally dependent on one another. “You shall love your neighbor as yourself” (Mt 22:39).

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1890) There is a certain resemblance between the union of the divine persons and the fraternity that men ought to establish among themselves. (CCC 1891) The human person needs life in society in order to develop in accordance with his nature. Certain societies, such as the family and the state, correspond more directly to the nature of man.
 
(The next question is: What is more important, society or the individual?)

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Youcat commented through CCC – Question n. 321- Part I.



YOUCAT Question n. 321 – Part I. Can a Christian be a radical individualist?


(Youcat answer) No, a Christian can never be a radical individualist, because man is by nature designed for fellowship.

A deepening through CCC

(CCC 1877) The vocation of humanity is to show forth the image of God and to be transformed into the image of the Father's only Son. This vocation takes a personal form since each of us is called to enter into the divine beatitude; it also concerns the human community as a whole. (CCC 1879) The human person needs to live in society. Society is not for him an extraneous addition but a requirement of his nature. Through the exchange with others, mutual service and dialogue with his brethren, man develops his potential; he thus responds to his vocation (Cf. GS 25 § 1).     

Reflecting and meditating 

(Youcat comment) Every person has a mother and a father; he receives help from others and is obliged to help others and to develop his talents for the benefit of all. Since man is God’s “image”, in a certain way he reflects God, who in his depths is not alone but triune (and thus life, love, dialogue, and exchange). Finally, love is the central commandment for all Christians; through it we profoundly belong together and are fundamentally dependent on one another. “You shall love your neighbor as yourself” (Mt 22:39).

(CCC Comment)

(CCC 1878) All men are called to the same end: God himself. There is a certain resemblance between the union of the divine persons and the fraternity that men are to establish among themselves in truth and love (Cf. GS 24 § 3). Love of neighbor is inseparable from love for God.

(This question: Can a Christian be a radical individualist? is continued)